Duck - Duck - Fish Game


At Becky Adlington Training, we're proud to have the most dynamic, engaging, passionate tutors in the industry leading our courses. We know how rewarding teaching the next generation of swimmers can be - and the best way to do this is through fun! 

This week, our tutor Kelly wanted turn to share her Game of the Week. With a career in swimming spanning almost two decades, including 2 years as a lead teacher at the University of Wales, 2 years as a Swimming Development Officer for Newport City Council, an Ofsted Grade 1 National Training provider, and a qualified Swim England Tutor since 2007, it’s no surprise that Kelly has a passion for all things swimming. 

So, the big reveal. Kelly’s Game of the Week is… *cue drum roll*

 

The old school playground classic, 'Duck - Duck - Fish' (aka Duck - Duck - Goose)

 

How to play:

No equipment needed for this game, unless of course your swimmers need buoyancy aids or you want to adapt for fun and add equipment. 

 

1. Create a Circle: Have the swimmers create a circle with plenty of space in the middle of the pool, the bigger the circle the more challenging the game, you do this in shallow water for less able swimmers, and tread water in the deep end for more capable/higher staged swimmers.

2. One swimmer chosen/volunteers to the be the picker or 'shark' and stays outside of the circle

3. The 'shark' will start walking/travelling/swimming around the outside of the circle, gently tapping the top of each swimmers head saying either 'duck' or 'fish'. Typically the shark will say 'duck' several times before selecting someone saying 'fish'. This creates suspense and an element of surprise for everyone in the circle wondering if they will be the 'fish.

4. Choose a 'fish' and swim. At a time of their choosing, the shark selects a 'fish' and they both take off around the circle, travelling/walking/swimming with the fish trying to catch the shark. the fish's goal is to tag the shark before they get back to the fish's spot in the circle. If the shark gets back to the empty spot in the circle first, then the fish now becomes the 'shark'. If the fish catches the shark, another round starts. 

 

"This is a great example of how you can turn traditional playground and land-based games into pool activities, with a bit of imagination, effective and safe use of pool space and equipment. This game develops fundamental movement skills of agility, balance, coordination, speed, running, kinaesthetic awareness and buoyancy plus its adaptable to all abilities and a fantastic, fun, whole class inclusive activity". 

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